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Be Art, Be Culture, Be Style

Art

 

Art Basel 2014

Welcome to the favorite winter meeting place for the international artworld. At the nexus of North America and Latin America, this Art Basel show presents artwork from across the globe. Over 250 of the world’s leading galleries participate, drawing over 70,000 visitors each year.

VSC bring “CUBAN COLLECTORS” a small presentation of the contemporary cuban art

 

 

Vedado Social club is associated with GORTAZAR Art Project and  is proud to organize and create a series of events named “SANARTE“,  along with Randall Gortazar, in which there are presented works by Cuban artists, such as:

René Portocarrero (born Havana, 24 February 1912; died Havana, 27 April 1985) was a Cuban artist recognised internationally for his achievements<br />He began his artistic education at the San Alejandro academy, but left early and is hence considered ‘self taught’.[1] He put on his first exhibition in 1934, at the Havana Lyceum, beginning a long and fruitful career which included a 1937 collaboration with Mariano Rodríguez and work as a ‘free studies’ teacher of painting and sculpture.[2] After travels in Haiti, Europe and the United States he gave his first show to an overseas audience at Julien Levy’s gallery in New York City in 1945.[3] In 1950 he worked with Wifredo Lam, Mariano, Martinez Pedro and Amelia Palaez in the village of Santiago de las Vegas. In 1961 he had meetings with Fidel Castro in the Jose Marti National Library where they discussed culture. René received lessons in painting from Nicolás Guillén Landrián.[4] In 1977 he worked for the Japan Women’s Association. In 1979 he worked for UNESCO and AIAP. He knew Peggy Guggenheim.[5] In the 1980s he was the teacher of Victor Miquel Moreno Piñeiro (Victor Moreno), cousin of Servando Cabrera Moreno.[6]

Amelia was born in 1896 in Yaguajay, in the former Cuban province of Las Villas (now Sancti Spíritus Province). In 1915, her family moved to Havana, to the La Víbora district, and this gave her the opportunity to enter the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes "San Alejandro" at the rather late age of 20 years (students at this academy usually start at 12–13 years of age). She was among Leopoldo Romañach's favourite students. By 1924, she exposed her paintings for the first time, along with another Cuban female painter, María Pepa Lamarque. She transferred to Europe in 1927, and established herself in Paris, although she paid short visits to Spain, Italy and other countries.[1] In Paris, she took drawing courses at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, and later entered the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, and the École du Louvre. In 1931, she started studying with female Russian painter Alexandra Exter. The Zak Gallery hosted her paintings in 1933, and next year she returned to Cuba. She received a prize in the National Exposition of Painters and Sculptors in 1938, and collaborated with several art magazines in Cuba, such as Orígenes, Nadie Parescia and Espuela de Plata. In 1950 she opened a workshop at San Antonio de los Baños, a small city near Havana, where she dedicated herself, until 1962, to her favourite pastime: pottery. She sent her paintings to the São Paulo Art Biennial in 1951 and 1957, and participated in 1952's Venice Biennale. In 1958 she was a guest of honour and integrated the International Jury of the first Inter-American Paints and Drawing Biennale.[1] Aside from painting and pottery, she dedicated time to murals, located mainly at different schools in Cuba. Her most important works of this type are a 65-foot-tall (20 m) ceramic mural at the Cuban Ministry of Internal Affairs (1953) and the facade of the Habana Hilton hotel in 1957. She died in Havana in 1968.

Amelia Pelaez was born in 1896 in Yaguajay, in the former Cuban province of Las Villas (now Sancti Spíritus Province). In 1915, her family moved to Havana, to the La Víbora district, and this gave her the opportunity to enter the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes “San Alejandro” at the rather late age of 20 years (students at this academy usually start at 12–13 years of age). She was among Leopoldo Romañach’s favourite students. By 1924, she exposed her paintings for the first time, along with another Cuban female painter, María Pepa Lamarque. She transferred to Europe in 1927, and established herself in Paris, although she paid short visits to Spain, Italy and other countries.[1]<br />In Paris, she took drawing courses at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, and later entered the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, and the École du Louvre. In 1931, she started studying with female Russian painter Alexandra Exter. The Zak Gallery hosted her paintings in 1933, and next year she returned to Cuba.<br />She received a prize in the National Exposition of Painters and Sculptors in 1938, and collaborated with several art magazines in Cuba, such as Orígenes, Nadie Parescia and Espuela de Plata. In 1950 she opened a workshop at San Antonio de los Baños, a small city near Havana, where she dedicated herself, until 1962, to her favourite pastime: pottery. She sent her paintings to the São Paulo Art Biennial in 1951 and 1957, and participated in 1952’s Venice Biennale. In 1958 she was a guest of honour and integrated the International Jury of the first Inter-American Paints and Drawing Biennale.[1] Aside from painting and pottery, she dedicated time to murals, located mainly at different schools in Cuba. Her most important works of this type are a 65-foot-tall (20 m) ceramic mural at the Cuban Ministry of Internal Affairs (1953) and the facade of the Habana Hilton hotel in 1957. She died in Havana in 1968.

Servando Cabrera Moreno (1923 – 1981) was a Cuban painter. A supporter of the Cuban Revolution, many of his paintings depict the Cuban peasantry. Stylistically, his paintings are rooted in the tradition of vanguardia, and are especially indebted to the work of Carlos Enríquez Gómez.
Servando Cabrera Moreno was born in Havana, Cuba in 1923. He graduated from the San Alejandro Academy after completing studies at the Art Student’s League in NY and La Grande Chaumière in Paris. His first individual exhibition took place at the Lyceum, Havana in 1943. He has also participated in many biennials in Venice, Mexico and São Paulo as well as other collective exhibitions. Cabrera Moreno has received a number of prizes at Cuban salons; a gold medal at the Panamerican Tampa Exhibition and silver medal at the International Joan Miró Drawing Contest in Barcelona. His work can be found throughout the world in museums, galleries and private collections.

 Antonio Guerrero Born 1968 in Matanzas, Cuba
Lives and works in Miami Beach, Florida

Antonio Guerrero is a contemporary Cuban artist. He was born in 1968 in Matanzas Cuba, under the Castro regime. Guerrero grew up in a household where artistic expression was appreciated and encouraged; although materials were not always available, his dreams and ideas were always abundant.
In 1986 Antonio was drafted into the army and was immediately transported to Africa to fight in the Ethiopian War. He was inspired by the people and scenes of Africa and he developed an interest in modern expressionism and began to experiment with modern forms of visual art. The popularity of his work led to exhibits of his paintings at the military base.
Guerrero returned to Cuba in 1988 where he resumed his job as an artisan specializing in painting, engraving woodcarving, sculpting and metal work. Feeling increasingly oppressed by Cuba’s government, and unhappy with the worsening living conditions, Antonio, along with two other men, climbed into a raft they had secretly designed and built. Floating off from the coast of Matanzas, they were at sea for five days before being rescued and brought to the U.S.
In January of 1995 Guerrero’s “Balseros del 92”, (“The Rafters of 92”) was exhibited at Vanidades Gallery in Miami, FL. This painting was part of a collection donated to the Jose Marti Foundation in order to raise money for the Florida International University student scholarships. This portrait of himself along with his cousin and friend fleeing Cuba was said to best commemorate the occasion. On May 17, 1996 Guerrero’s work was exhibited by U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen in Washington D.C. as a part of the “Cubans in exile” exhibit.
In his paintings Guerrero sees the world as a cosmic stage for human activity. “I’m in the system like a computer programmer writing codes with my sketchbook and brushes, playing the critic, here to create and program the unconscious. Apart from all the trouble we cause ourselves, I believe we are immersed in a powerful and beautiful mystery. The fact of our existence is a great riddle to me.”
“In his imaginary world everything is possible, shadows fall according to nature’s intent, trees grow from earth, and triangles refract light in a realistic manner. But all of that realism is just Antonio’s way of holding the scene together so that he could go on to upset our normal expectations of reality.

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